Publications and Conference Presentations

Refereed publications at conferences sponsored by ACM, IEEE, IARIA, and UNESCO.

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Madsen, K. et al, “Life at the edge of the Internet,” United Nations Educational and Scientific Organization, Memory of the World conference, Vancouver, CA, Sept 26, 2012
The Memory of the World in the Digital age: Digitization and Preservation, 26-28 September 2012, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

ABSTRACT: This paper presents our research and field work with the Waorani Indians in eastern Ecuador regarding how they can preserve their digital heritage and culture on the Internet. We focused on empowering the Waorani to use technology to approach the Internet on their terms: to tell their story, not have their story told, to be independent, not dependent. Using analogies to life in the jungle, we explored issues such as digital self-determination, proprietary file formats, control of material entrusted to cloud service providers, international data import/export, content ownership vs. licensing, and intellectual property. Archival systems are only as valuable as their input data. This data is at risk due to competing economic and legal forces that can adversely influence content, digitization, ownership, and permitted usage. To address this problem, we present an encryption framework that encourages medical tourism to indigenous villages by protecting archived medical data, privacy, and constitutional rights.

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Madsen, K. “Collaboration Strategies for Distributed Teams: A Case Study of CAD Systems Integration” ieee.org, Conference on Systems (IEEE / IARIA). Mar 6, 2009. Cancun, Mexico
Presented at the Fourth International Conference on Systems, ICONS 2009, March 1-6, 2009 - Cancun, Mexico

ABSTRACT: Software development becomes more challenging when teams are geographically distributed. One cause is that certain activities in the development lifecycle are inherently collaborative. This paper presents our experiences applying strategies that improved collaboration on our global team. Our experiences are drawn from a project in which we developed a system to integrate a computer-aided design tool with an online parts library. First, we identify common barriers to collaboration and the challenges they presented to our team. Barriers such as language differences, time zones, and miscommunication hindered our progress by creating challenges such as ambiguity in requirements, misunderstandings of design intent, and rework. Next, we present the strategies we used to overcome these barriers. Our approach led to a successful project with a few detours along the way.

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Kurt Madsen. 2005. Agility vs. stability at a successful start-up: steps to progress amidst chaos and change. In Companion to the 20th annual ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object-oriented programming, systems, languages, and applications (OOPSLA '05). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 313-318. DOI=http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1094855.1094966
Presented at the OOPSLA 2005 conference in San Diego, California, October 19, 2005.

ABSTRACT: It is not uncommon for good technical solutions to fail in the marketplace. Equally true, great business opportunities are not always met with appropriate technical solutions. While there can be many causes to such failures, one common problem is the gap between expectations and implementation. Extreme Programming is an excellent delivery methodology for bridging this gap. This paper presents lessons learned from applying Extreme Programming in a start-up environment. In particular, the challenges of meeting and adapting to evolving requirements are presented.

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Kurt Madsen. 2003. Five years of framework building: lessons learned. In Companion of the 18th annual ACM SIGPLAN conference on Object-oriented programming, systems, languages, and applications (OOPSLA '03). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 345-352. DOI=http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/949344.949441
Presented at the OOPSLA 2005 conference in Orange County, California, October 29, 2003.

ABSTRACT: When developing large software systems, it is often difficult to foresee exactly which trade-offs are important, and which quality parameters will be of importance down the road. This paper reports experiences from a project in which a large application framework for B2B integration has been continuously developed and used over a five-year period. The framework has been the foundation for a variety of different concrete applications. Here we will report on our experiences from this endeavor.

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